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The e-Mosquito bites you to monitor glucose levels

The e-Mosquito bites you to monitor glucose levels

Researchers at the University of Calgary have released the

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DeepMind Health inks another 5-year NHS app deal in face of ongoing controversy

DeepMind Health inks another 5-year NHS app deal in face of ongoing controversy

DeepMind Health, the division of the Google-owned AI company that’s applying machine learning to medical data in the hopes of profiting from diagnostic gain, has inked another services agreement with the UK’s National Health Service — expanding the deployment of an alerts, messaging and task management app, Streams , to a hospital in Taunton & Somerset.

This expansion comes despite ongoing controversy over the company’s first NHS data-sharing agreement . The sharing of 1.6 million patients’ medical records with DeepMind by the Royal Free NHS Trust during the development of Streams remains under investigation by the UK’s data protection watchdog, the ICO.

Patients were not informed nor their consent sought. Yet the Streams app has since been actively deployed in the Royal Free’s hospitals. And DeepMind is now forging ahead further, by inking a commercial agreement with a second NHS Trust to deploy the task management app.

Announcing the latest Streams app agreement on its blog , DeepMind makes no mention of the ongoing data-sharing consent controversy attached to the app’s development.

“At Musgrove Park Hospital, part of Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, [Streams’] features will alert doctors and nurses to a potential deterioration in their patients’ vital signs that could indicate a serious problem,” it writes. “We believe that by making it as quick and easy as possible for clinicians to intervene if something is wrong, we’ll be able to improve patient safety across the hospital.”

DeepMind would not comment when asked about the ethics of expanding a commercial rollout when doubt has been cast over the legal basis under which patients’ data was obtained and used during the development phase of the app.

DeepMind and the Royal Free previously maintained there was no need for them to obtain patient consent for the sharing of medical records as the Streams app would be used for so-called ‘direct patient care’. However this  May a review of the arrangement by the UK’s patient data safety advisory body, the National Data Guardian (NDG), resulted in Dame Fiona Caldicott taking a very different view.

“My considered opinion therefore remains that it would not have been within the reasonable expectation of patients that their records would have been shared for this purpose,” wrote Caldicott in a letter sent to DeepMind and the Trust in question on February 20.

The NDG has been liaising with the ICO as part of its investigation into the data sharing.

Asked whether it has had any specific concerns relating to the controversy surrounding Streams, the Trust’s deputy chief executive Peter Lewis told us: “Clearly we are taking the information governance issues around this very seriously. And we’ve looked at exactly what we are doing with that app, and will be doing with DeepMind. Clearly we’ve taken the appropriate advice on that. So we’re quite clear in terms of what we’ve done and that it’s legal, what we’re doing.”

There is not yet a firm date for launch of Streams within Musgrove Park Hospital, whose website states it treats

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Do Not Disturb While Driving feature rolls out in Apple’s newest iOS 11 beta

Do Not Disturb While Driving feature rolls out in Apple’s newest iOS 11 beta

With the release of iOS 11’s latest beta on Wednesday, testers can now get their hands on one of the new mobile operating system’s most important – if not most glamorous – new features: a long-needed “Do Not Disturb While Driving” mode. Announced in June at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference, the feature aims to combat the very dangerous practice of texting from behind the wheel, while also switching off other alerts that entice people to look at their phones while driving.

Distracted driving has become a national safety crisis due to the rise of smartphones. According to statistics from the U.S. Department of Transportation, 10 percent of fatal crashes, 15 percent of injury crashes, and 14 percent of all police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes were attributed to distracted driving – a blanket term that broadly encompasses cell phone use, as well as other in-car activity like adjusting the radio or climate controls, for example.

In 2015, 3,477 people were killed because of distracted driving, and 391,000 were additionally injured.

A number of third parties have approached the problem by offering mobile applications that prevent texting while the vehicle is in motion, but these can only really be integrated at the system level on Android devices. Because iOS applications run in a “sandbox” environment, they can’t interfere with iOS functions – like preventing someone from texting. Carriers have then stepped in with their own measures, like AT&T’s DriveMode , but these focus on silencing calls and text alerts, but not push notifications from apps.

Because of iOS’s lack of a built-in feature, app makers have come up with all sorts of workarounds, such as the use of external hardware , for example. But more often than not, iOS apps could only offer a monitoring solution, rather than a tool to actually block the activity. Other app makers haven’t even bothered trying to port their solution to iOS.

Do Not Disturb While Driving feature rolls out in Apple’s newest iOS 11 beta

Apple’s “Do Not Disturb While Driving” feature isn’t a tool to fully prevent texting or alerts while in a moving vehicle. Instead, it offers to clamp down on distractions at a system level in a way that Apple has never before offered.

The feature, when active, will be able to tell if you’re in a car when your phone is connected to the car’s USB connection or Bluetooth. It will also be able to use the iPhone’s sensors to determine your speed, even if your phone isn’t connected to a car.

“It’s all about keeping your eyes on the road,” Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi when introducing the feature at WWDC in June. “When you’re driving, you don’t need to respond to these kind of messages. In fact, you don’t need to see them,” he said while showing off a demo where the phone was receiving push notifications from apps like Twitter, Tinder, and Words with Friends.

However, the iPhone itself is not on total lockdown. CarPlay functionality still works, for example. You can also still play your music or

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Facebook equips admins to protect and analyze their Groups

Facebook equips admins to protect and analyze their Groups

Facebook sees Groups as the core of its push to “build community”, as Mark Zuckerberg detailed in his 6,000-word humanitarian manifesto. So today at its Communities Summit in Chicago where it assembled 300 admins of top Groups, Facebook is making good on Zuckerberg’s promise to give admins more tools to manage their flocks. These include Group analytics, membership request filtering, removed member clean-up, scheduled posts, and group-to-group linking.

Facebook equips admins to protect and analyze their GroupsThese tools automate or facilitate the busy-work that Group admins were already slogging through manually to assist their constituencies. Their roll out should increase the sharing of resonant content as well as the sense of tight-knit comraderie and vulnerability in groups — ranging from activist leagues to patient support networks to hobbyist clubs.

“Groups have been around since the very beginning of Facebook”, Chief Product Officer Chris Cox tells me. “The original Facebook was more of a communities product than it was about friends. ‘Who else was in my dorm? Who else was in my school? Who else was in my club?’ It wasn’t sharing photos of with my friends, which is what Facebook became.”

Cox says that almost wistfully, as if he’s internalized Facebook’s slide from deepening real-world bonds towards digital voyeurism. But Facebook’s on a new mission to reclaim that original purpose.

In fact, today Facebook unveiled its new mission statement: “ Give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.” This evolution from “making the world more open and connected” acknowledges that more raw connection isn’t always good — it must be in the service of strengthening our bridges to the people and world around us. And to turn the mission into a goal, Zuckerberg says Facebook wants to help 1 billion people join meaningful communities.

But first, Facebook needs to equip admins to make their Groups more meaningful. In his community letter Zuckerberg wrote that Facebook needed to “build more tools to empower community leaders . . . to run and grow their groups the way they’d like.” Here they are:

Group Insights: Analytics have been Facebook’s top request from Group admins, so it’s hooking them up with a similar Insights product to what Page admins have on both web and mobile. This includes real-time growth, membership, and engagement metrics, including how many posts are being published and when their content is most popular. Understanding what content resonates could help admins share more like it.

Facebook equips admins to protect and analyze their Groups

 

Scheduled Posts: Along with analytics to know the best time to post, Facebook is allowing admins and moderators to schedule posts at those times, or to compose content whenever’s convenient for them and post it later. This permits busy Group admins to write a bunch of posts over the weekend, and then schedule them to publish throughout the week, which is especially important since all these admins are essentially volunteers with day jobs.

Facebook equips admins to protect and analyze their Groups

 

Group To Group Linking: Some Groups are local chapters of bigger organizations, or are connected to similar groups with overlapping memberships. Group to group

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SmellPGH lets you report weird smells in Pittsburgh

SmellPGH lets you report weird smells in Pittsburgh

Today in odd apps I present

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