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Mobile gaming sessions down 10 percent year-over-year, but revenue climbs

Mobile gaming sessions down 10 percent year-over-year, but revenue climbs

The U.S. is leading the world in mobile gaming, accounting for 20 percent of all sessions played. That’s the word from a new industry report on the mobile gaming landscape, released this week from Flurry. That puts the U.S. ahead of markets including India, China, Brazil and Russia, it found. However, gaming sessions are dropping, even as the money to be made in games climbs, and the total time spent gaming remains largely unchanged.

According to the report, mobile gaming sessions are down 10 percent year-over-year. That’s even with the outsized hits like Pokémon Go gobbling up huge chunks of users’ time and attention.

Mobile gaming sessions down 10 percent year-over-year, but revenue climbs

This is not the first time Flurry has spotted a decline in gaming. In January, the firm reported it had seen a 4 percent drop in terms of the time spent in games (which is different from sessions, aka individual app launches). Meanwhile, messaging and social apps saw a 394 percent increase in time spent, Flurry had said.

It’s also the second year in a row that gaming sessions have fallen year-over-year. This signals, perhaps, the ephemeral nature of mobile games, and the industry’s reliance on addictive hits.

Mobile gaming sessions down 10 percent year-over-year, but revenue climbs

But it mainly speaks to specific declines in particular gaming categories. Three years ago, arcade, casual and brain games drove 55 percent of all sessions. In the time since, there have been substantial declines in both arcade and casual games, says Flurry. For example, arcade games accounted for 24 percent of all gaming sessions in 2014 – a figure that’s now decreased by 34 percent. And casual gaming sessions are down by 50 percent.

These two drops alone accounted for the overall downturn in gaming sessions, and no other gaming category stepped in to pick up the losses.

However, it’s not all bad news for mobile games. Though sessions may be down, the time spent in mobile games is largely unchanged – it’s up by 1 percent over last year. That means users are participating in fewer, but just slightly longer gaming sessions than in the past.

Flurry didn’t theorize why this could be, but it’s possible the Pokémon effect is one factor here, as is the fact that games themselves have matured. While there are still plenty of quickly played, disposable titles to be found, the App Store today also features beautifully made, more immersive games like Monument Valley 2 , for example, which Apple itself even promoted during its WWDC event this month.

Mobile gaming sessions down 10 percent year-over-year, but revenue climbs

In the U.S., the average consumer is now spending 33 minutes per day in mobile games, with sessions that have increased to 7 minutes, 6 seconds this year, up from 6 minutes, 22 seconds in 2016. This is a big jump – sessions never exceeded 6 minutes in either 2014 or 2015.

The gaming industry has also grown more diverse over the years. Sessions today are spread out across a large number of app categories. For example, card and casino games now account for 15 percent of all sessions, up 22 percent since

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Intel steps up security efforts in Israel with Team8, Illusive and a new cyber center

Intel steps up security efforts in Israel with Team8, Illusive and a new cyber center

Israel is one of the world’s centers for cybersecurity technology, and today Intel is announcing a trio of developments in the region to help it take better advantage of that. The company is embarking on two new collaborations with Israeli security startups Team8 and Illusive (which was spun out of Team8), and it’s expanding its cyber center in the country.

From what we understand, there is no investment news coming out of either Intel’s relationship with Team8 or Illusive — not today, at least. Both companies count a number of strategic backers who are investors — including Cisco and Microsoft Ventures for Illusive ; and AT&T, Cisco, Microsoft, Nokia and Qualcomm for Team8 — so it’s reasonable to guess that Intel is likely to make a similar move public down the line. We’ve reached out to Intel to ask about investments.

In the meantime, what we know is that Intel will be working on two projects with the two companies. Team8 — a security incubator founded by alums of the Israeli Defense Forces — will exchange cyber threat information with Intel to work on new products together, specifically, “with an end towards developing cyber solutions that respond to current risks but even more importantly, to future ones.”

Team8 and its focus on providing a collaborative environment to focus on building security products — sometimes even to would-be competitors — is reminiscent of what Element AI is trying to build in Montreal to address the information-race in the world of artificial intelligence, and providing tools and knowledge to businesses that want to make sure they are taking advantage of the newest innovations, but do not have the core competencies to develop those solutions on their own.

“The collaboration is meant to help Intel develop cutting edge cyber technologies and products,” said Rick Echevarria, VP of Intel’s software and services group and GM of Intel’s platform security division, in a statement. “Team8 will be instrumental in helping us pinpoint the opportunities for Intel innovation to address the challenges in the cyber security segment.”

The Illusive Networks deal concerns a more specific aspect of security: the two will collaboration to build a solution for Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs). This builds on tech that Illusive has developed around so-called deception frameworks. As we’ve explained before ,  Illusive’s speciality is in building false “virtual networks”, designed to lure in, trick and trap malicious hackers who are breaking into a company’s networks to do harm. Hence the name “Illusive”, a portmanteau of illusion and elusive.

“Creating an innovative solution that combines both software and hardware demonstrates illusive’s commitment to protect at every level of cyber defense,” said Illusive’s CEO Ofer Israeli, in a statement. “Attackers are innovating at a very rapid pace and this collaboration demonstrates Intel’s engagement to move beyond traditional security measures and effectively protect its customers against sophisticated adversaries.” Given that Illusive counts companies like Microsoft among its strategic investors, the idea is likely that it’s developing similar services not only to secure Microsoft’s

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Watch former Apple engineers and Scott Forstall discuss the creation of the iPhone

Watch former Apple engineers and Scott Forstall discuss the creation of the iPhone

Last night at the

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Volvo’s Polestar is now its own company focused on performance EVs

Volvo’s Polestar is now its own company focused on performance EVs

Volvo tuner Polestar, which the carmaker acquired in 2015 to build its own race-ready Volve cars, is now being set up as its own separate company within the Volvo group, with a new focus on performance electric vehicles. The new Polestar will have its own branding, distinct from Volvo’s – though it’ll still produce performance versions of Volvo cars in addition to its own models,

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Rinse raises $14M in Series B funding to bring its laundry pick-up nationwide