Google Hor

advertisement

Political News

Mulvaney unsure if Obamacare repeal will pass

Mulvaney unsure if Obamacare repeal will pass

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney said that it is "up to the House to count their own votes." | AP Photo

...

Mulvaney unsure if Obamacare repeal will pass

Mulvaney unsure if Obamacare repeal will pass

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney said that it is "up to the House to count their own votes." | AP Photo

...

Obamacare repeal vote too close to call

trump_ryan_gty.jpg

The move by President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan is an enormous gamble, setting up a real cliffhanger when the legislation hits the floor on Friday. | Getty

The moment of truth arrives for the Republican Party’s years-long drive to repeal the health care law.

By Rachael Bade , Kyle Cheney and Josh Dawsey

03/23/17 11:58 AM EDT

Updated 03/23/17 09:28 PM EDT

President Donald Trump is demanding a vote Friday in the House on the Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told GOP lawmakers. If the bill fails, Trump is prepared to move on and leave Obamacare in place, Mulvaney warned.

The surprise announcement by the top White House official — made with the full support of Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and other House GOP leaders — came during a closed-door meeting of Republicans Thursday evening in the basement of the Capitol.

Story Continued Below

Mulvaney, a member of the House until a few weeks ago who now heads the Office of Management and Budget, said Trump was done negotiating and wanted an up-or-down vote now.

The move by Trump and Ryan is an enormous gamble, setting up a real cliffhanger when the legislation hits the floor on Friday.

All day Thursday, the White House and GOP leaders lacked the votes to pass the American Health Care Act. A loss on the House floor would be a glaring embarrassment for the new president and House speaker — one that could undermine other parts of the GOP legislative agenda, including tax reform.

A victory, on the other hand, would provide not just a shot of badly-needed momentum for both men, but undermine the House Freedom Caucus, the group of conservative hard-liners who've fought the GOP health care plan because it doesn't go far enough.

The group's opposition was seen as a public rebuke to both the White House and House GOP leadership. If the the Freedom Caucus loses to Trump and Ryan, its power will be curtailed. If it wins, the group will once again be able to dictate terms to party leaders.

Yet this is the showdown that many mainstream GOP rank-and-file members have sought. They want a fight out in the open with the Freedom Caucus — either the group votes against Trump, or it gives in.

Negotiations between Trump and the Freedom Caucus hit an impasse earlier Thursday its members were told recent concessions from the White House and GOP leadership represented a final offer. The group rejected that, wanting more.

The setbacks triggered another series of meetings later Thursday — between Trump and the moderate Tuesday Group, and separately between the Freedom Caucus and Ryan. That was followed by a full GOP Conference meeting where Trump played his trump card.

Trump and Ryan had found themselves playing see-saw with moderates and hard-liners: Lean too much toward one faction and they lose votes from the other. So far, they've been unable to find a sweet spot.

Ryan can afford to

...

Obamacare repeal vote too close to call

trump_ryan_gty.jpg

The move by President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan is an enormous gamble, setting up a real cliffhanger when the legislation hits the floor on Friday. | Getty

The moment of truth arrives for the Republican Party’s years-long drive to repeal the health care law.

By Rachael Bade , Kyle Cheney and Josh Dawsey

03/23/17 11:58 AM EDT

Updated 03/23/17 09:28 PM EDT

President Donald Trump is demanding a vote Friday in the House on the Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told GOP lawmakers. If the bill fails, Trump is prepared to move on and leave Obamacare in place, Mulvaney warned.

The surprise announcement by the top White House official — made with the full support of Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and other House GOP leaders — came during a closed-door meeting of Republicans Thursday evening in the basement of the Capitol.

Story Continued Below

Mulvaney, a member of the House until a few weeks ago who now heads the Office of Management and Budget, said Trump was done negotiating and wanted an up-or-down vote now.

The move by Trump and Ryan is an enormous gamble, setting up a real cliffhanger when the legislation hits the floor on Friday.

All day Thursday, the White House and GOP leaders lacked the votes to pass the American Health Care Act. A loss on the House floor would be a glaring embarrassment for the new president and House speaker — one that could undermine other parts of the GOP legislative agenda, including tax reform.

A victory, on the other hand, would provide not just a shot of badly-needed momentum for both men, but undermine the House Freedom Caucus, the group of conservative hard-liners who've fought the GOP health care plan because it doesn't go far enough.

The group's opposition was seen as a public rebuke to both the White House and House GOP leadership. If the the Freedom Caucus loses to Trump and Ryan, its power will be curtailed. If it wins, the group will once again be able to dictate terms to party leaders.

Yet this is the showdown that many mainstream GOP rank-and-file members have sought. They want a fight out in the open with the Freedom Caucus — either the group votes against Trump, or it gives in.

Negotiations between Trump and the Freedom Caucus hit an impasse earlier Thursday its members were told recent concessions from the White House and GOP leadership represented a final offer. The group rejected that, wanting more.

The setbacks triggered another series of meetings later Thursday — between Trump and the moderate Tuesday Group, and separately between the Freedom Caucus and Ryan. That was followed by a full GOP Conference meeting where Trump played his trump card.

Trump and Ryan had found themselves playing see-saw with moderates and hard-liners: Lean too much toward one faction and they lose votes from the other. So far, they've been unable to find a sweet spot.

Ryan can afford to

...

The Man Who Would Beat Bibi

Benjamin Netanyahu is a survivor. He’s beaten back what looked to be near-certain defeat at the polls more than once. He’s outlasted hard-line rivals and liberal critics to become Israel’s longest continuously serving prime minister, and if he can hang on two more years, would even outdo David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s idolized founding father, to claim the overall record in the job.

And in many ways, 2017 looks to be his year.

Story Continued Below

He’s finally free of the meddlesome President Barack Obama, whose demands for a settlement freeze, critical lectures, Iran deal and failed peace talks eventually led to an open rupture with the White House. Even better, from Netanyahu’s point of view, Obama’s replacement is Republican Donald Trump, who’s just gotten a settlement-funding Orthodox Jew confirmed as his new ambassador, vowed to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem — and tapped his own Orthodox son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to help him cut a deal to finally end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict once and for all. As Aaron David Miller, a veteran of the peace talks under five U.S. presidents, put it recently, “Netanyahu can’t believe his good fortune.”

So why is it that a guy named Yair Lapid, whom few have heard of outside Israel, and who entered politics only five years ago, is beating Netanyahu in poll after poll these days? Is Bibi fatigue finally kicking in?

“I can’t think of any other democracy in which the same person was prime minister, or president, or head of state in 1996 is still the head of state,” Lapid tells me in an interview for The Global POLITICO, our podcast on world affairs. “So maybe the people of Israel tell themselves, ‘It’s time to say thank you and we’re moving on.’ And the country needs to move on. We’ve been stuck in the same place for quite a while now.”

The late Shimon Peres, the peacemaker behind the Oslo Accords who was beaten by Netanyahu in an election he was widely expected to win, was famous for saying the polls are like perfume, best to be smelled not drunk. Are these latest surveys showing Netanyahu’s vulnerability and Lapid’s surprising strength, for real? And do they matter at a time when Trump and his advisers actually seem to be getting serious about rekindling a peace process just about everyone else had given up for dead?

***

Yair Lapid has been called many things in the five years since he entered politics after a long career as perhaps Israel’s most recognizable TV anchor. An empty suit. A political cipher. An opportunist.

And also: the next big thing in Israeli politics and the cure for what ails an increasingly sclerotic democracy.

Some these days even see him as Israel’s answer to Donald Trump, a celebrity come lately to politics, with no discernible ideology and a flair for popular slogans.

Labels aside, whatever he’s doing seems to be working, and Lapid’s newfangled politics—heavy on the requisite tough talk about Israeli security but with an emphasis

...
You are here: Asian-Americans Home Politics