Melania Trump entered US with 'Einstein' visa designated for people with 'extraordinary ability'

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Melania Trump entered the United States in 2001 after receiving a green card visa designated for people with "extraordinary ability," according to a new Washington Post report.

The wife to President Trump was one of only five people from Slovenia who entered the United States in March of 2001 under the EB-1 program, which has been described as the "Einstein visa." This detail surrounding the first lady's immigration journey comes after Melania's own parents recently faced criticism for potentially relying on an immigration process referred to by some as "chain migration" that their son in law wants to end.

In the late '90s and earlier 2000's, a then Melania Knauss could be seen gracing runway shows in Europe, billboard cigarette ads and the pages of Sports Illustrated's swimsuit edition. The EB-1 program, which was written into U.S. immigration policy via the Immigration Act of 1990, was built to let in researchers, business executives and others who demonstrated "sustained national and international acclaim."

According to the Post, over one million green cards were granted in 2001 alone, and only 3,376 were issued to immigration with "extraordinary ability."

"Mrs. Trump was more than amply qualified and solidly eligible," Michael Wildes, an attorney for Melania Trump and her family said to the Post. "There is no reason to adjudicate her petition publicly when her privacy is so important to her."

After ordering the end to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy -- which will effectively cease to exist as policy on March 5 -- President Trump has tweeted many times about immigration as he and Capitol Hill lawmakers attempt to find middle ground on issues surrounding national security, border wall protection and the status of an estimated 3.6 million "DREAMers" who brought to the U.S. undocumented as children.




House Speaker Paul Ryan deletes tweet about woman's $1.50 weekly paycheck increase after fierce backlash

House Speaker Paul Ryan is facing criticism Saturday after tweeting a report referencing a woman from Pennsylvania who saw an increase of $1.50 on her weekly paycheck stemming from the recently passed GOP tax-reform bill. 

In the tweet, Ryan included a link to an AP report describing how some people in the workforce have seen more take-home pay coming from the new withholding guidelines as the result of the bill's passage.

“A Secretary at a public high school in Lancaster, PA, said she was pleasantly surprised her pay went up $1.50 a week...she said she [that] will cover her Costco membership for the year.”


Some on social media were pretty upset about the tweet, including a Democratic senator and former Obama speechwriter.

Trump administration shuts Haiti out of seasonal worker program

Rule tightening follows end to humanitarian program that allowed tens of thousands of Haitians to live and work in U.S.

The Trump administration is further tightening immigration rules for Haitians, as it plans to remove the country from a program for temporary seasonal jobs, weeks after ending a humanitarian program that allowed tens of thousands of others to live and work in the U.S.

According to a notice that was set to be officially published in the Federal Register on Thursday, Haiti is being removed from a list of countries approved for the H-2A and H-2B visa programs as its participation “is no longer in the U.S. interest.” The programs permit certain foreigners to take temporary seasonal jobs in agriculture and other industries in the U.S., including tourism.

Haitians represent just a fraction of foreigners participating in temporary worker programs. During the 2016 budget year, 883 temporary workers and their relatives were admitted to the U.S., according to government data. During that same 12 months, more than 218,000 such visas were issued to people from around the world.

The visa change is the latest move by the Trump administration to curb Haitian immigration to the U.S. and comes days after President Donald Trump last week, during a bipartisan immigration meeting at the White House, questioned the need to extend legal immigrant status to Haitians.

Late last year, then-acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke announced the end of a humanitarian program that let roughly 50,000 Haitians live and work in the U.S. in the wake of the deadly 2010 earthquake that devastated parts of the country. They were given until July 2019 to either leave or apply for another immigration status.





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