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A feminist glossary because we didn't all major in gender studies

CLOSE A feminist glossary because we didn't all major in gender studies
A feminist glossary because we didn't all major in gender studies

We've broken down some words you should know when discussing feminism or other gender topics. USA TODAY

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A woman raises her fist during a demonstration for International Women's Day in Paris on March 8, 2017. (Photo: Gabriel Bouys, AFP/Getty Images)

Like any "ism," feminism is rich with jargon, which can lead deeply personal conversations to turn unnecessarily dense. While some terms are entrenched, others are contemporary additions to an evolving lexicon. To help you break through, here are definitions for everything from "feminism" and "misogyny" to "bropropriated" and "feminazi."

The basics

Feminism:  Belief in and desire for equality between the sexes. As Merriam-Webster noted last month: "the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities." It encompasses social, political and economic equality. Of course, a lot of people tweak the definition to make it their own. Feminist activist bell hooks  calls it "a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression."

Patriarchy:  A hierarchical-structured society in which men hold more power.

Sexism: The idea that women are inferior to men.

Misogyny:  Hatred of women.

Misandry:  Hatred of men.

A little deeper

Hostile sexism: The one most people think about. Openly insulting, objectifying and degrading women.

Benevolent sexism:  Less obvious. Kind of seems like a compliment, even though it's rooted in men's feelings of superiority. It's when men say women are worthy of their protection (off the sinking boat first) or that they're more nurturing than men (therefore should raise children). It's restrictive.

Internalized sexism: When the belief in women's inferiority becomes part of one's own worldview and self-concept.

Misogynoir:  Misogyny directed toward black women.

LGBTQ:  The acronym for “lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and  queer .” Some people also use the Q to stand for "questioning," meaning people who are figuring out their sexual or gender identity. You may also see LGBTQIA. I stands for  intersex  and A for asexual/aromantic/agender.

Cisgender:  A term  used to describe a person whose gender identity aligns with the sex assigned to them at birth.

Transgender:  A person whose gender identity  differs from the cultural expectations  of the sex they were assigned at birth.

Transphobia: Prejudice toward trans people.

Transmisogyny: A blend of transphobia and misogyny, which manifests as discrimination against "trans women and trans and gender non-conforming people on the feminine end of the gender spectrum." 

TERF: The acronym for "trans exclusionary radical feminists," referring to feminists who are transphobic.

SWERF: Stands for "sex worker exclusionary radical feminists," referring to feminists who say prostitution oppresses women.

Gender fluidity:  Not identifying with a single, fixed gender.

Non-binary: An umbrella term for people who don't identify as female/male or woman/man.

Women of color:  Women who aren't white.

Title IX:  Protects people from  discrimination based on sex  in education programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance.

Victim-blaming:  When the victim of a crime or harmful act is held fully or partially responsible for it. If you hear someone questioning what a victim could have done to prevent a crime, that's victim-blaming, and it makes it harder for people to come forward and report abuse. Groups

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Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

CLOSE Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan
Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

House Speaker Paul Ryan cancelled the vote on the GOP's health care bill that would've replaced Obamacare, saying he could not get enough votes to support it. USA TODAY

EPA USA HEALTHCARE CONGRESS POL GOVERNMENT USA DC

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C. (Photo: MICHAEL REYNOLDS, EPA)

WASHINGTON — Despite calling Freedom Caucus members friends last week, President Trump seemed to take aim Sunday at the Republican hard-line conservatives and blame them in part for the collapse of the party’s health care repeal plan.

“Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!’’ Trump tweeted early Sunday.

The tweet came on the heels of a major blow for Republicans when leaders pulled Friday their plan to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act, because they didn't have enough GOP support to pass the measure. Several moderate Republicans and members of the Freedom Caucus vowed not to support it. All the Democrats were expected to vote against it.

Freedom Caucus members defended their positions, saying the plan pushed by House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., cost too much and didn't do enough to repeal the law. Rep. Mark Meadows, chairman of the caucus, didn't directly challenge's Trump charge, but said it's "incumbent upon'' moderates and conservatives to come together.

"I can tell you as I've looked at all of this, I said, could I have spent a little bit more time, should I have spent more time with the Tuesday Group, more time with Democrats to find some consensus,'' Meadows, R-N.C., said on ABC’s This Week.  "As we look at this today, this is not the end of the debate."

The Tuesday Group consists of more moderate House Republicans.

Trump said Friday he was surprised there wasn’t more support from the Freedom Caucus, but he didn’t blame them for deciding not to vote on the bill.

“I’m disappointed, but they’re friends of mine,’’ he said then. ‘’It’s a very hard time for them and very hard vote. But they’re very good people."

Democrats were quick to jump on the defeat. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called it "a victory for all Americans."

Meadows said Democrats shouldn't consider the fight over.

“If they're applauding, they shouldn't, because I can tell you that conversations over the last 48 hours are really about how we come together in the Republican conference and try to get this over the finish line," he said.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Democrats are willing to work with Republicans on an effort to improve the ACA.

“We have ideas. They have ideas, to try to improve Obamacare,” Schumer said on This Week . “We never said it was perfect. We always said we'd work with them to improve it. We just said repeal was off the table.”

Read more :

Trump's anti-Freedom Caucus tweet followed another Twitter burst on Saturday morning, in which he urged his Twitter followers to watch the Saturday night show of Jeanine Pirro, a Fox television show host and former prosecutor.

Pirro opened the show by calling on Ryan to step down as speaker, because he

...

Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

CLOSE Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan
Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

House Speaker Paul Ryan cancelled the vote on the GOP's health care bill that would've replaced Obamacare, saying he could not get enough votes to support it. USA TODAY

EPA USA HEALTHCARE CONGRESS POL GOVERNMENT USA DC

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C. (Photo: MICHAEL REYNOLDS, EPA)

WASHINGTON — Despite calling Freedom Caucus members friends last week, President Trump seemed to take aim Sunday at the Republican hard-line conservatives and blame them in part for the collapse of the party’s health care repeal plan.

“Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!’’ Trump tweeted early Sunday.

The tweet came on the heels of a major blow for Republicans when leaders pulled Friday their plan to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act, because they didn't have enough GOP support to pass the measure. Several moderate Republicans and members of the Freedom Caucus vowed not to support it. All the Democrats were expected to vote against it.

Freedom Caucus members defended their positions, saying the plan pushed by House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., cost too much and didn't do enough to repeal the law. Rep. Mark Meadows, chairman of the caucus, didn't directly challenge's Trump charge, but said it's "incumbent upon'' moderates and conservatives to come together.

"I can tell you as I've looked at all of this, I said, could I have spent a little bit more time, should I have spent more time with the Tuesday Group, more time with Democrats to find some consensus,'' Meadows, R-N.C., said on ABC’s This Week.  "As we look at this today, this is not the end of the debate."

The Tuesday Group consists of more moderate House Republicans.

Trump said Friday he was surprised there wasn’t more support from the Freedom Caucus, but he didn’t blame them for deciding not to vote on the bill.

“I’m disappointed, but they’re friends of mine,’’ he said then. ‘’It’s a very hard time for them and very hard vote. But they’re very good people."

Democrats were quick to jump on the defeat. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called it "a victory for all Americans."

Meadows said Democrats shouldn't consider the fight over.

“If they're applauding, they shouldn't, because I can tell you that conversations over the last 48 hours are really about how we come together in the Republican conference and try to get this over the finish line," he said.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Democrats are willing to work with Republicans on an effort to improve the ACA.

“We have ideas. They have ideas, to try to improve Obamacare,” Schumer said on This Week . “We never said it was perfect. We always said we'd work with them to improve it. We just said repeal was off the table.”

Read more :

Trump's anti-Freedom Caucus tweet followed another Twitter burst on Saturday morning, in which he urged his Twitter followers to watch the Saturday night show of Jeanine Pirro, a Fox television show host and former prosecutor.

Pirro opened the show by calling on Ryan to step down as speaker, because he

...

Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

CLOSE Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan
Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

House Speaker Paul Ryan cancelled the vote on the GOP's health care bill that would've replaced Obamacare, saying he could not get enough votes to support it. USA TODAY

EPA USA HEALTHCARE CONGRESS POL GOVERNMENT USA DC

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C. (Photo: MICHAEL REYNOLDS, EPA)

WASHINGTON — Despite calling Freedom Caucus members friends last week, President Trump seemed to take aim Sunday at the Republican hard-line conservatives and blame them in part for the collapse of the party’s health care repeal plan.

“Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!’’ Trump tweeted early Sunday.

The tweet came on the heels of a major blow for Republicans when leaders pulled Friday their plan to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act, because they didn't have enough GOP support to pass the measure. Several moderate Republicans and members of the Freedom Caucus vowed not to support it. All the Democrats were expected to vote against it.

Freedom Caucus members defended their positions, saying the plan pushed by House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., cost too much and didn't do enough to repeal the law. Rep. Mark Meadows, chairman of the caucus, didn't directly challenge's Trump charge, but said it's "incumbent upon'' moderates and conservatives to come together.

"I can tell you as I've looked at all of this, I said, could I have spent a little bit more time, should I have spent more time with the Tuesday Group, more time with Democrats to find some consensus,'' Meadows, R-N.C., said on ABC’s This Week.  "As we look at this today, this is not the end of the debate."

The Tuesday Group consists of more moderate House Republicans.

Trump said Friday he was surprised there wasn’t more support from the Freedom Caucus, but he didn’t blame them for deciding not to vote on the bill.

“I’m disappointed, but they’re friends of mine,’’ he said then. ‘’It’s a very hard time for them and very hard vote. But they’re very good people."

Democrats were quick to jump on the defeat. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called it "a victory for all Americans."

Meadows said Democrats shouldn't consider the fight over.

“If they're applauding, they shouldn't, because I can tell you that conversations over the last 48 hours are really about how we come together in the Republican conference and try to get this over the finish line," he said.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Democrats are willing to work with Republicans on an effort to improve the ACA.

“We have ideas. They have ideas, to try to improve Obamacare,” Schumer said on This Week . “We never said it was perfect. We always said we'd work with them to improve it. We just said repeal was off the table.”

Read more :

Trump's anti-Freedom Caucus tweet followed another Twitter burst on Saturday morning, in which he urged his Twitter followers to watch the Saturday night show of Jeanine Pirro, a Fox television show host and former prosecutor.

Pirro opened the show by calling on Ryan to step down as speaker, because he

...

Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

CLOSE Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan
Trump takes aim at Freedom Caucus over defeat of GOP health care plan

House Speaker Paul Ryan cancelled the vote on the GOP's health care bill that would've replaced Obamacare, saying he could not get enough votes to support it. USA TODAY

EPA USA HEALTHCARE CONGRESS POL GOVERNMENT USA DC

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C. (Photo: MICHAEL REYNOLDS, EPA)

WASHINGTON — Despite calling Freedom Caucus members friends last week, President Trump seemed to take aim Sunday at the Republican hard-line conservatives and blame them in part for the collapse of the party’s health care repeal plan.

“Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!’’ Trump tweeted early Sunday.

The tweet came on the heels of a major blow for Republicans when leaders pulled Friday their plan to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act, because they didn't have enough GOP support to pass the measure. Several moderate Republicans and members of the Freedom Caucus vowed not to support it. All the Democrats were expected to vote against it.

Freedom Caucus members defended their positions, saying the plan pushed by House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., cost too much and didn't do enough to repeal the law. Rep. Mark Meadows, chairman of the caucus, didn't directly challenge's Trump charge, but said it's "incumbent upon'' moderates and conservatives to come together.

"I can tell you as I've looked at all of this, I said, could I have spent a little bit more time, should I have spent more time with the Tuesday Group, more time with Democrats to find some consensus,'' Meadows, R-N.C., said on ABC’s This Week.  "As we look at this today, this is not the end of the debate."

The Tuesday Group consists of more moderate House Republicans.

Trump said Friday he was surprised there wasn’t more support from the Freedom Caucus, but he didn’t blame them for deciding not to vote on the bill.

“I’m disappointed, but they’re friends of mine,’’ he said then. ‘’It’s a very hard time for them and very hard vote. But they’re very good people."

Democrats were quick to jump on the defeat. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called it "a victory for all Americans."

Meadows said Democrats shouldn't consider the fight over.

“If they're applauding, they shouldn't, because I can tell you that conversations over the last 48 hours are really about how we come together in the Republican conference and try to get this over the finish line," he said.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Democrats are willing to work with Republicans on an effort to improve the ACA.

“We have ideas. They have ideas, to try to improve Obamacare,” Schumer said on This Week . “We never said it was perfect. We always said we'd work with them to improve it. We just said repeal was off the table.”

Read more :

Trump's anti-Freedom Caucus tweet followed another Twitter burst on Saturday morning, in which he urged his Twitter followers to watch the Saturday night show of Jeanine Pirro, a Fox television show host and former prosecutor.

Pirro opened the show by calling on Ryan to step down as speaker, because he

...
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